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[Past Seminar]Nov.2.2016 Macromolecular Engineering by Taming Free Radicals

   
Macromolecular Engineering by Taming Free Radicals
 
Prof. Krzysztof Matyjaszewski
Carnegie Mellon University
 Time:Wednesday, November 2, 2016. 9:00am
Place:BUCT Library Center Conference Room

Biography:

Krzysztof (Kris) Matyjaszewski, Ph.D., professor in the department of chemistry at the Mellon College of Science, Carnegie Mellon University, is an internationally recognized polymer chemist who is highly regarded for his vision, his leadership in education and his many collaborative research efforts that have yielded significant innovations in polymer chemistry.  He is perhaps best known for the discovery of atom radical transfer polymerization (ATRP), a novel method of polymer synthesis that has revolutionized the way macromolecules are made.

Professor Matyjaszewskihas authored 17 books, 84 book chapters and more than 866 peer-reviewed scientific papers. His work has been cited in the scientific literature more than 65,000 times, making him one of the most cited chemists in the world. He is a co-inventor on 50 issued U.S. patented technologies, holds 147 international patents and has 36 U.S. patent applications pending approval.  

Professor Matyjaszewski has received numerous awards for his work, including the 2014 National Institute of Materials Science (Japan) Award, the Inaugural AkzoNobel North American Science Award (ACS) 2013, the 2012 Société Chimique de France Prize, 2012 Dannie-Heineman Prize from the Goettingen Academy of Sciences 2011 Wolf Prize in Chemistry, 2011 Japanese Society for Polymer Science Award and 2009 Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge Award. In 2010, he was elected as Fellow of the American Chemical Society. In 2006, he was elected a member of the U.S. National Academy of Engineering. In 2014, he was elected a Fellow of National Academy of Inventors (NAI). He is also a member of Russian Academy of Sciences and honorary member of Chinese Chemical Society and Israel Chemical Society.